Posts Tagged ‘service management’

Resolution Method – A Missing Metric

September 11, 2012

Plan-Net, as a provider of managed IT services and as an IT consultancy, has performed numerous scopings for its customers over recent years – a scoping being the process of assessing, distilling, analysing and reporting on a customer’s IT support service with aim of identifying opportunities to improve service, to reduce cost and to maximise value.

Through the course of running IT service scopings, Plan-Net has compiled the standard findings into a benchmarking matrix.  Such a benchmark is a useful tool as it allows the comparison of one service with many others and it allows us to know how an individual aspect of a service fairs against the average or within a minimum to maximum range.  It can help sense check a current service and potentially contributes to the setting of targets for service improvement.

However, it’s not the process of maintaining and using a benchmark that I would like to discuss. Instead, it’s the common absence of a support metric that most Service Desks fail to record.

Ticket Resolution Method is a metric that tells us the conditions under which a Service Desk analyst managed to resolve a ticket, i.e. did the analyst resolve the ticket by: guiding the user over the phone or via email dialogue, leaving his/her desk to perform a deskside visit, using remote control tools, or referring the user to suitable self-help material?

In our 15 most recent scoping exercises (including firms across multiple sectors with staff numbers from 300 to 6500), only one Service Desk recorded the resolution method used for each ticket.

The reason the resolution method is so useful is that it provides Service Desk management with an indicator of efficiency, which on its own is useful, but which also helps to make sense of other support metrics.

Even if just two options are available to an analyst when selecting a ticket’s method of resolution, the information it ultimately provides a Service Desk Manager is extremely useful:

  • Phone/Email – Indicating the analyst resolved the ticket only by entering into dialogue on the phone or via email
  • Deskside Visit – Indicates that the analyst left their desk to visit the end user in person

There are two main distinctions between a ticket resolved by Phone/Email, and those resolved with a Deskside Visit.  If resolved by Phone/Email, then the analyst remained at his/her desk, thereby avoiding travel time around the building and gaps in time from resolving the preceding ticket and taking the next.  Additionally, a ticket resolved by Phone/Email doesn’t require the analyst to be off-service, i.e. unable to answer in-bound phone calls to the Service Desk.

If the ratio of tickets resolved by each of the two methods can later be reported on, then immediately the Service Desk Manager will have a metric which can be used to help improve their service.  Unless an organisation specifically wants to provide its users with deskside support (and some do despite the cost), then the Service Desk manager can begin to take steps to increase the volume of tickets resolved by Phone/Email, thereby reducing the number requiring more time consuming deskside visits, and so making the Service Desk more efficient.  Such efficiencies may then be noticeable in other areas: call abandonment rates (the frequency that users attempt and fail to phone the Service Desk) may reduce as a result of having analysts on service for more of the time, and Service Level Target performance may improve as less time is lost to Deskside visits.

Reporting on resolution method can also be useful when looking at individual analyst performance.  An analyst with relatively low tickets resolved per day, with a higher ratio of Deskside Visits versus Phone/Email resolutions, might be able to improve their overall performance by being less keen to attend to desk and to do more from their own workstation.

Further efficiency gains may also be made if additional methods of resolution are available, for instance if a Service Desk maximises the use of remote support tools.  Remote tools can be a good alternative to deskside visits as they can accomplish the same outcome but in less time.  If available to an analyst as a resolution method option, tickets resolved in this way should further support the Service Desk Manager in improving his/her service as the reliance on Deskside visits could fall further.

The merits of recording resolution method, using it as a KPI (key performance indicator) of a service, linking it to other support metrics, and ultimately achieving performance and financial gains could be discussed and debated until the cows come home.  But a call to action might simply be the recommendation of recording this useful metric as part of your ticket resolution process.  The overhead of recording it will be negligible on your analyst’s time but will provide valuable information on what might be considered the most important part of your incident management process – the resolution.

Jon Reeve, Principal Consultant

Top 5 must-have processes for IT service management

May 29, 2012

In these times of uncertainty we are all now familiar with a single word: “austerity”. In the boom times before the global economies went into meltdown I suspect many people had never even heard the word, let alone had to live that Imageway, but now we are all being asked to tighten our belts – and this applies to companies as well. Now more than ever, investing in IT Service Management makes sense, but not in the same way as a  few years ago, when the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) became a real trend. Many companies’ objectives were to adopt all processes, regardless of whether they were appropriate or useful for them.  Now the focus has changed. Organisations are now less interested in “badges” and more in how some aspects of the ITIL framework and other best practice methodologies can help them become more efficient and introduce their own austerity measures.

There is currently a strong need for practical examples and demonstrable results rather than mere theory. Processes are now being hand-picked and tailored to each individual organisation, which can bring fast results – this can really allow businesses to work more efficiently, reduce losses and downtime and, possibly, leverage more from the tools and resources they already have.

But although each individual organisation needs a different set of best practice processes, tailored to their environment, there some essential must-haves that no company should do without:

1 – Change Management

This is the ‘number one’ essential process to improve your IT service availability. It means changes have to be planned, thought through and the consequence understood before any change, large or small, to the IT Service can take place. This does not mean it has to slow changes down as the process can be tailored to each company’s needs, but it does mean that, in some form, each change is considered before it takes place. This alone means that less mistakes are made, which improves your service availability.

2 – Incident Management

Things break and IT services are no different. What is important is how quickly you can get things back working again when this happens. Incident management allows you to create a process that everyone understands to handle these eventualities and restore your services as quickly as possible. Having people unable to work or access the services they require costs an organisation money, so this is more important than ever now. Having a robust incident management process means that the right resources can quickly be assigned to sort out the issue and make sure that your staff can get back to what you employ them for.

3 – Request Fulfilment

In this world of “just in time” ordering where everyone expects to receive everything they want faster and more cheaply than before, for IT this can present a challenge.  Software licenses and hardware components need to be delivered quickly to enable a customer to do their role or become productive quickly after joining an organisation, but conversely, companies need to control costs and make sure they only order what is required and that they do not have licenses or hardware sitting on the shelf depreciating. Having a good request fulfilment process can ensure this does not happen and also ensures the effective tracking of assets. In combination with a “catalogue” of approved components the user is able to select what they require for their job in the knowledge that IT have already confirmed that it will work with everything else. IT  are happy as they know that new device you just connected to the network is not going to slow everyone down or worse!

4 – Supplier Management

It is important for organisations to keep track of their suppliers: are they doing well? Will they still be around next year ? Are they delivering the service and value my organisation requires? Are we paying for services we no longer need?  A  good Supplier Management process means that you can answer these questions and more. It also allows you to provide your supplier with a roadmap of what your business is doing and so allows them to better support your needs going forward. Managing the relationship proactively means that you should rarely have to resort to any SLA penalties – it’s much better to make sure the situation that could cause the penalty is avoided rather than having to experience the impact that caused it in the first place.

5 – Service Level Management

It is important to know what the business requires from its IT services. Not knowing can either mean that the service delivered is not correctly supporting the business or that the IT service being delivered is actually exceeding what the business requires; both of these can cost an organisation money.

Service level management means that the correct Service Level agreements can be put in place to ensure the IT service meets the business need, but also to ensure that the IT service is not “over engineered” and effectively costing more than required. If you’re paying for a Mini but only receiving a push bike then you will be unhappy, equally why pay for a Ferrari when the Mini is all you need.

In these austere times it might just be the right moment to trade in that Ferrari for a Mini!

David Tuck, Principal Consultant

Just how much of a saving is the reduction of heads from an IT support team?

March 20, 2012

ImageIn a bid to meet the demands of an FD who needs to see cost savings across the organisation, often it’s a portion of an IT team that have to go.  On the face of it, it’s an easy choice.  Those within an IT team will often perform the same functions as one another, therefore, if one or more leave the team, it can still perform all its required tasks, albeit a bit slower than before.

But what might not have been considered in such decision making is the organisation’s profile of staff’s expected IT skills and the speed-of-service demands.  If the two are considered together, an optimal ratio of IT staff to company staff can be derived which can be used as a benchmark against any planned reductions in heads.

Definitions:

Staff’s expected IT skills – Some business environments may have a low expectation on its staff in terms of their IT skills.  A law firm is a good example as it’s more beneficial to the organisation if their legal teams are fee earning (by practicing law), instead of being able to clear their own printer jams.  Other organisations, perhaps a software house, will have employees who are more than capable of dealing with common IT issues.  In these examples, the law firm is clearly going to need a greater ratio of IT support people to staff members than the software house.

Speed-of-service demand – An investment bank, or indeed any organisation that is wholly reliant on IT to trade, will tolerate only the most minor of IT interruptions, whereas some business types might be able to suffer IT delays for hours, or even days, without any particular impact on their business.  Those with the need for greater speed of service, or even immediate need for service, will require a greater ratio of IT support people to staff members compared with those that don’t.

If these two aspects of a business’ IT culture are considered together, one can begin to determine the optimal number of IT support people to staff members.

For organisations with a low expectation of staff’s IT skills, but who need rapid IT support, a ratio of 1 support person to every 50 members of staff, might be appropriate.  The other extreme, high staff IT skills coupled with lower speeds of support, may lead to a ratio of 1 support person to every 200 members of staff.

Then, if there is a need to cut heads, a more informed choice may be made, i.e. just how many heads may be lost without: a) requiring the established IT culture to change, or b) having a detrimental impact of the organisation’s ability to trade?

Of course, this thought process and logic need not only apply to difficult times, when reducing costs is a priority.  It can apply to times of business success and be used as a means of determining the best IT support fit for the business.

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Jon Reeve, Principal Consultant

‘Cloud Consultancy’ – Experience On Demand

September 27, 2011

The value of consultancy in Service Management projects

For many organisations, expenditure towards IT is often a sticky subject – there never seems to be a big enough budget for IT related projects. This is especially true when these concern Service Management. Whereas it is easier to justify spend for hardware or software that needs to be updated or refreshed, Best Practice has always been more difficult to sell to the CFO.

This hasn’t always been the case. A few years ago, before the credit crunch, many organisations invested in ITIL training and qualifications for their own internal personnel. It was ‘the thing to have’ – but things have radically changed now. With tighter IT budgets and an increasing need for improved efficiency in this unstable economic climate, a great number of organisations are nowadays less interested in buying Service Management training for their in-house staff.

Putting staff through Service Management training is not only expensive and time consuming, but also not particularly effective on its own: even with the best qualifications, they would still lack that real-world experience that is so important for a successful outcome. In the same way, ITIL is being seen as  self-obsessed and often being thought as a mere money machine. There is an increasing awareness that Best Practice frameworks need not to be taken as a step-by-step guide – there is a growing necessity for the common-sense principles to be tailored and adapted to a specific IT environment.

What organisations are looking for is not to have the whole ‘knowledge pack’ but rather direct access to relevant knowledge and experience – an expert that can analyse their environment and tell them what aspects of ‘Best Practice’ would benefit their company. They don’t want to buy books, they want to buy expertise – and this is where Service Management consultancy comes into the picture.

An external Service Management professional will have both the knowledge and the experience, often more extensive than any in-house staff could have. This is because they will have worked with different clients, and therefore seen various environments and shared several experiences. They can compare an organisation with others with a similar or completely different system and give them advice on what would work for them, what kind of improvements they should make and what their strengths and weaknesses are.

In a world where everything within IT is becoming ‘on demand’ – software, platforms, databases – it seems Service Management couldn’t avoid following the trend, which has become a necessity for organisations living in constant fear of a double dip recession. Consultants can help by offering direct access to their knowledge base and the appropriate guidance for specific projects. This way, organisations will only ‘buy’ the knowledge and experience that is relevant to them and only for the necessary length of time to complete their project.

In particular, organisations now want a collaborative approach. They want an expert that can help them understand if their ideas are feasible, convenient and efficient and how best to achieve the results they aim at. They can show them what to do, train their staff and support them every time there is an issue, but without the financial burden of being there all the time.

Although very current, this ‘Cloud Consultancy’ is not anyone’s cutting-edge invention. It can instead be seen as the result of the current economic climate: organisations need on-demand resource, knowledge and experience with built in flexibility. It is a natural development to suit these times of economic uncertainties, and provide organisations with the necessary tools to grow and pursue success.

Sharron Deakin, Principal Consultant

Seeing life through ITIL’s lens

November 8, 2010

Does a Service Management professional’s brain never stop seeing ‘incidents’ and ‘problems’ around them?

On my way to the itSMF conference in rainy London, I saw a woman trip on wet marble as she entered the tube station. As she fell to the floor on her backside I automatically thought: ‘This could have been easily avoided with Proactive Problem Management!’

In fact, tripping-on-wet-marble can be seen as a ‘known error’ since it has happened before and continues to happen over and over every time it rains, and would be easily resolved by placing a sufficient number of anti-slip rubber mats right at the entrance, where the floor is wet and slippery.

Is it just me who sees life applications for ITIL principles?

 

Samantha-Jane Scales, Senior Service Management consultant


Saving ITIL – how to protect the reputation of Best Practice frameworks

October 12, 2010

Since the news came out that the Office of Government Commerce stated in a report by the Office of Public Sector Information they had ‘no policy remit’ to produce and develop the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) methodology, various articles and blogs have been written declaring the ‘death of ITIL’, or at least of the discipline as we know it.

This has been interpreted by some as an intention to drop official support due to lack of interest, since ITIL is admittedly not one of the OGC’s core responsibilities. Critics believe the move will make ITIL an even more lucrative money machine for vendors and service providers which may end in self-sabotage. Most opponents have focused their editorials on the consequences of this move on the Best Practice framework’s quality and credibility, or have taken this as an occasion to declare that ITIL is already overrated and over-praised.

Those who welcome the change, instead, believe it would be a good thing for ITIL to be free, open and available to all. However, there seems to be little analysis of what the choice made by the OGC might mean, the pros and cons of a liberated Best Practice framework and, ultimately, hardly any propositions on how to save the framework’s reputation.

Taking into account such pros and cons, it is difficult to have a clear opinion on thesituation. There can definitely be some benefits in liberating a framework – for instance, it creates an opportunity for professionals to provide recommendations and contribute with ideas and innovations which derive from their personal experience. They are able to interact more comprehensively with the discipline, allowing it to grow, improve and change with the market and the various business environments it operates in.

But labels like ‘ITIL’ – which have become brand names – are often used as a sales tool to sell books, memos and software, and by making it even more commercial the risk is that the discipline will lose its authority. Let’s take Neuro-Linguistic Programming as an example. As there is no regulation, people are free to say that they are NLP practitioners although they are only recognised within their own training company, and their methodology may be different from practitioners who come from another company. There is no official recognition of what is good and bad practice in NLP, therefore it may not be felt as a discipline one can rely on alone.

So if any consultancy, training company, book author and software vendor was able to say that their product or service is ‘ITIL aligned’, although it complies with their version of ITIL which might be different from another one, then it would be impossible to have some measurable quality standards that can be used to evaluate and choose. If you take away standardisation and consistency, if there isn’t a strong and consistent identity or an independent body that can set standards, the framework will practically cease to exist.

To reassure readers, the ambiguous OPSI report does not state that the OGC has no interest in ITIL and, in fact, it still owns copyright on the product. The information on the report might mean that the body will outsource development but will still have the last word on content and the power to approve a product or service. If this is the case, then the situation might prove ideal for the reasons stated above, balancing the pros and cons in a safer scenario.

But this is not the main problem with Best Practice frameworks, it seems. An example of one that is not supported by an official body but is still popular and widely used is the Microsoft Operations Framework (MOF). Although it is free and available to everybody, it doesn’t appear to be very different from ITIL in its recognition, methodology and principles. Nevertheless, it appears to have the same issues that consultants see in ITIL as it is – there is a lot of emphasis on gap-fill documents and selling books rather than in delivering a thorough understanding of the processes and aims. Unless the professional who downloads the templates and fills the gaps understands the content and context of what they are doing, it has little value and probably little effectiveness. It is apparent, then, that freeing the discipline doesn’t solve the issues behind Best Practice frameworks, nor does keeping control over it.

Perhaps the problem is not about ITIL being endorsed by an official body or not, but rather how to enhance the reputation and effectiveness of Best Practice frameworks. Disciplines such as ITIL and MOF need to find a way to overcome their credibility issues, cease to be mere money machines and become what they are supposed to be – guidelines for carrying out operations in the best possible way to reach efficiencies and cost savings. Only if Service Management professionals start believing in the ‘wider aims’ and practicing the discipline with a thorough understanding of what is being done, will it be possible for such frameworks to regain trust and, ultimately, to really deliver results.

Samantha-Jane Scales, Service Management consultant

Find this column on ITSM Portal: http://www.itsmportal.com/columns/saving-itil-%E2%80%93-how-protect-reputation-best-practice-frameworks

Doing more with less: an opportunity to learn

May 7, 2010

Budget reduction teaches organisations to prioritise – a lesson to be learnt not only by the public sector.

The recently announced budget has not been kind to public sector IT, just as expected. Large cuts mean that most technology projects will have to be shelved, but this does not make the level of performance the sector is craving for impossible to be reached – on the contrary, budget reduction is the kind of incentive that drives organisations to prioritise and to seek efficiencies, focusing more on operational, rather than capital expenditure. This does not apply exclusively to the public sector, of course: many private companies are struggling with similarly tight purse strings, so there is a lesson to be learnt for them as well from such challenging circumstances. 

Quick-fix plans which consist of simply reducing the number of personnel and only purchasing tools to replace the most obsolete assets are unlikely to represent the best way to preserve, let alone increase efficiency. With most operations nowadays recognising that IT forms the backbone of the organisation, it is clear that a wiser roadmap must be designed. Clear-sighted organisations, then, will have a strategy which sees them realigning roles and improving skills within their IT department, implementing relevant Best Practice processes and adopting tools and technologies that can help towards reducing overall operating costs while improving efficiency, such as virtualised servers and automated service desk management software. Scoping and planning is vital in order to design a strategic solution that is bespoke, fit-for-purpose and scalable, hence fit not only for present conditions but the medium term as well, and to demonstrate clearly what cost efficiencies a well-balanced mix of people, process and technology can achieve. 

In terms of staffing, it seems that many IT Service Desks lack the skills and tools to deal with most of the calls at first-line level, and therefore become overburdened with an unnecessary (not to mention costly) number of second-line engineers, which are also, because of their more ‘flexible’ nature, often slower in dealing with incidents. An up-skilling of first line support in conjunction with Best Practice procedures and the adoption of automated software which can deal with simple and repetitive incidents such as password resets may take the level of first-time fix from as little as 20-30 per cent to 60-70 per cent. This means that a smaller total number of support personnel are needed, especially at second line, and that the business will be remarkably improved, with incidents taking less time to be resolved, resulting in a more efficient service for users.

Best Practice implementation is a key component in this cost-effective innovation project. The adoption of procedures based on a discipline such as ITIL (Information Technology Infrastructure Library) will help any organisation function in the best possible way. The processes described by ITIL deal, among others, with the management of incidents, risks and change. The latter is of particular relevance: to deal with any alteration to the system, be it small or large, without causing inefficiencies, disruptions and consequently business or client loss it is important to have a mature level of Change Management already in place.

Because of the difficulty of accepting change and truly understanding this new way of working, ITIL-based experiential learning sessions are an important aid in delivering the discipline so that change can effectively happen, and to guarantee active participation of all staff taking part in the training. This should not only be limited to people that are directly affected, but extend to management who equally need to embrace the importance of best practice.

Another smart innovation that takes the idea of ‘doing more with less’ in its most literal form is that of virtualisation. Through virtualising both the desktop and server environment cost savings from a reduction in user downtime and further improvements in levels of remote (and therefore first line) fixing can be substantial, not to mention further benefits seen in terms of reduced server maintenance costs (from personnel to energy consumption).

The steps to take may appear quite clear and straightforward, but current in-house skills, resources and experience might not be enough to deal with such innovation and, as a result, many organisations will need the expertise of a service provider. With regards to the public sector, the cheapest outsourcing option, commonly seen as offshoring, may be automatically ruled out due to information security issues. However, security concerns private organisations as well, especially ones which withhold information that is extremely sensitive, such as law firms and banks. These particular companies cannot risk the loss of reputation, not to mention a hefty fine that can follow a breach of the Data Protection Act by a non properly-trained employee or a non-secure service provider.

There is a solution, though, where cost-efficiency can be achieved at the same, or a lower price than an in-house solution. As predicted by analysts in the sector, it is probable that many organisations will be more and more driven towards adopting a managed service solution in the next couple of years. With Managed Services, Service Desk management is taken care of by a third party, often in the office premises, and while personnel and procedures are left in the hands of the provider the organisation still retains ownership of assets and power over data, particularly important when information withheld within the system is sensitive and cannot risk leakage or loss.

It is not uncommon to achieve cost savings of 15 per cent or more when compared to a similar, in-house option, saving organisations money and improving the overall functioning of operations, in turn creating more business opportunities and enhancing the users’ ability to maximise productivity.

When it comes to innovation and change, and especially when that may involve reductions of any kind, it might be true that a view from the inside is not likely to be the most objective. With that in mind, working with a specialist partner would seem to be the most logical conclusion; however, doing more with less is far more likely to be attainable in the long term if management visibility and control is retained internally to ensure IT is kept close to the heart of the organisation at all times. Balance, it seems, is key to success.

 

Jerry Cave, Director

This article features on the BCS website and in the BCS Service Management e-newsletter: http://www.bcs.org/server.php?show=conWebDoc.35420

5 thoughts on the IT Service Desk that need re-thinking

March 10, 2010

Slowly recovering from the crisis and with a more careful eye to the unsteadiness of the market, many organisations across all sectors are considering ways to make their IT Service Desk more cost-efficient, but some ideas decision-makers might have could be partially or totally wrong.
So if you are thinking any of the following, you might want to think again:

“Our Service Desk is costing us too much. Outsourcing it to [insert favourite low-cost country abroad] can solve the problem.”

Although outsourcing has it advantages, doing it off-shore is a huge investment and has a lot of hidden costs, including losses due to inefficiencies and disruptions during the transition or caused by bad performance – bad service can damage the business. Moreover, reversing the move can be a costly, lengthy and treacherous procedure. Before they consider drastic moves, organisations should try to identify the reasons their IT expenditure is so high. Likely causes could be inefficient management, poor skills or obsolete tools and processes. Best practice implementation, using automated ITIL-compliant software and updating IT skills are a first step towards efficiency; however, a more cost-effective outsourcing solution could be handing management of the Service Desk to a service provider that can take care of service improvement on site.

“If leading companies around the world are off-shoring, it must be convenient.”

Only Global organisations seem to gain great benefits from off-shoring their IT department, often being the sole solution to reduce their otherwise enormous spending. Just because many important organisations are doing it, it doesn’t mean it is suitable for all. For example, there are important cultural differences which may not be an issue for those organisations with offices and clients spread worldwide that are already dealing with a mixture of cultures, but can definitely cause problems for a relatively European company with a certain type of business mind. Another issue is costs: many organisations find that after the conspicuous initial investment, cost saving might not exceed 10% and what is more, the new facility sometimes creates extra costs that were unforeseen, actually increasing expenditure.

“Our system has always worked; I don’t see why we should change it.”

Technology is changing regardless of one’s eagerness, and it is important to keep up with the changing demands of the market in order to remain competitive. A certain system might have worked five years ago, but new technologies and procedures can make older ones obsolete and comparatively inefficient. Take server virtualisation for example: business continuity can reach astonishing levels thanks to live migration, guaranteeing a better service with the extra benefit of energy saving through consolidation. Adoption of ITIL Best Practice processes also helps increase efficiency not only in the Service Desk, but in the business as a whole. Thanks to its implementation, organisations can save time and money and enhance the smoothness and quality of all IT-reliant operations, which helps the entire business.

“We need more 2nd and 3rd line engineers.”

When problems need more second and third-line resolution, it probably means first line is not efficient enough. Thanks to specific automated software to help with simple incidents and to the adoption of software as a service managed by an external provider, the simplest and most complex issues are being taken care of, meaning some of the work of a first-line engineer and the whole work of third-line engineers are no longer an issue for the organisation’s IT staff. However, the remaining incidents still need a more efficient resolution at first-line level: the more incidents are resolved here, the less need there is to increase the number of more expensive second-line staff. To improve first-line fix, engineers need to be trained to follow Best Practice processes that can make incident resolution fast and effective, as well as help the organisation deal with change and prevent risks connected to data security.

“I’d rather we managed our IT ourselves – control is key.”

An organisation might be proficient in its field, but may find it difficult to manage its IT Service Desk as effectively. When cost-efficiency is important, it is best to leave one’s ego at the door and have experts do the job. The IT arena is constantly changing and continuous training and updating is necessary in order to keep up with the market standards, and an organisation often cannot afford to invest in constant innovation of their IT. If outsourcing, on and off-shore, gives organisations the impression of losing control, then managed services is a better solution: the existing team and tools, or new and improved ones, can be managed by a service provider directly on the office premises, if needed. Thanks to this, organisations can focus on the more important parts of their business, leaving IT to the techies while still keeping an eye on it.

 

Adrian Polley, CEO

Find this article online at Fresh Business Thinking: http://www.freshbusinessthinking.com/business_advice.php?CID=&AID=5004&Title=5+Thoughts+On+The+IT+Service+Desk+That+Need+Re-Thinking

From ITIL v2 to v3 – where to start?

February 8, 2010

ITIL v2 and v3 have been peacefully coexisting since the release of the new version in 2007, but with the forthcoming phasing out of v2 starting this year, many organisations are starting to plan their transition towards v3.  It is always hard to switch from the comfort of a widely-practiced and familiar method to a new version of it, and although most organisations seem to understand the tangible benefits of the enhanced discipline, the question remains: where do you start?

The problem, in fact, is often not why but how to carry out the transition – moving your organisation from operating in a v2 world to working more strategically in a v3 mindset requires a scale of undertaking that can be difficult when locked into busy operational roles.

So what is the first step?

As with all investments, you have to target what will give you the best ROI.  This means building on the investments you have made in V2 and using them as a launch pad into V3 while introducing only the V3 processes, which tangibly increases the value of the existing processes in place.

For many organisations, the first step forward is to close the front door of Service operations to Projects, throwing rubbish into BAU. To do this, the ideal move is to take a step back in the V3 lifecycle, into the Service Transition Planning and Support process.

Service Transition Planning and Support is a new V3 process which deals with the softer side of managing the transition of a service from Project to Operations.  It enhances the effectiveness of Change, Configuration, Incident and Release Management from version 2 by acting as the gatekeeper for BAU, ensuring their requirements are addressed before the Project is dropped on them.  It also helps Projects successfully navigate the engagement into Operations and those same processes.  Too often Projects and Operations work to two different agendas – V3 now gives us a process to bind the two together.

Starting the implementation of v3 through the Service Transition Planning and Support Process, then, is the ideal approach for a better understanding of the new and improved processes while easing the stress of getting accustomed to novelty. An integrated approach such as the one presented in this section is important for a better alignment of the organisation’s Service Transition plans with those of the customer and supplier, bringing business value as it improves the organisation’s ability to handle high volumes of change and releases across the whole of its customer base.

Will Sanderson

 

Will Sanderson, Service Management Consultant

 

This article has appeared on Fresh Business Thinking: http://www.freshbusinessthinking.com/business_advice.php?AID=4587&Title=From+Information+Technology+Infrastructure+Library+(ITIL)+V2+To+V3+%96+Where+To+Start%3F