Posts Tagged ‘data protection’

Legal and financial firms should follow the ICO’s data security guidelines, too

August 10, 2012

Just two days after the news of a Torquay health trust being fined £175,000 for publishing sensitive data of over 1,000 of their own employees on their website, the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) released the top five areas which need improvement in order to keep personal and sensitive information safe within an SME. Although aimed at charities and public sector organisations, these tips are also relevant to the private sector, in particular the financial and legal arena where a vast amount of personal and sensitive information is handled.

The guidelines issued by the ICO include giving employees data protection training, being clear on what use is made of personal information and having an established data retention period, where it is only kept for as long as necessary. It is important to highlight the emphasis on the ‘people’ factor and the role of security awareness training in the protection of information within an organisation. Human error is still the leading cause of data protection breaches across the UK, most of which are not malicious. About a third of all data breaches (36 per cent) are due to negligent employees, according to the latest Symantec/Ponemon Institute ‘UK cost of a Data Breach’ study. It is therefore crucial to give more attention to educating people rather than simply concentrating on purchasing the latest data protection tools and technology.

Organisations have to act in two ways: on one side, they have to train their employees so that they are more aware of data protection regulations, the applicable risks to the organisation and internal policies, as well as the consequences of not following these regulations and policies; on the other side, they need to protect themselves from their own employees, making sure encryption is used on all devices, as well as limiting access to data to only those who are authorised.

If personal and sensitive information is lost, stolen or made public, the organisation responsible for the breach will potentially face a hefty fine – but the consequences of a data breach are not only financial. Especially in the case of financial and legal firms, there will also be reputational damage which may be too difficult to recover from.

It may be the case that for a large multi-national company the money and reputational loss involved does not affect their bottom line or position within the market too much, it is not the same for small and medium-size enterprises. With less money at their disposal and a limited number of loyal clients, a large fine can severely affect their capital and the subsequent reputational loss might lead to business loss and, ultimately, failure.

For this reason, it is increasingly important that SMEs in the legal and financial sector invest time and resources on preventing information security incidents, in order to avoid having to pay for their mistakes at a later date. There is a lot of trust bestowed upon these organisations by their clients, so the least they can do is to make sure that their details are kept safe and secure, ensuring that this trust is well deserved.

David Cowan, Head of Consulting Services

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Private vs. public sector IT security: more dedicated staff, yet less awareness

March 3, 2011

According to recent data, the private sector lags behind with regards to data protection, while public sector organisations lead the way. David Cowan explains how firms can improve their IT security and avoid losing money, clients and reputation.

 

A recent survey commissioned by the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) revealed that there is a remarkable difference between the public and private sector’s approach to Information Security. The data contained in the research carried out by Social and Market Strategic Research (SMSR) showed that, in fact, the public sector was much more aware of the Data Protection Act principles compared to the private sector.

When asked to identify, unprompted, the main principles contained in the ACT, the 7th Principle ‘Personal information is kept secure’ was mentioned by 60% of public sector organisations, compared to only 48% of private firms. However, a more shocking divide can be found in the awareness of the Information Commissioner’s Office’s existence: 42% of private firms had not heard about it at all, a percentage that actually increased from the previous years – yet this was not the case for public organisations, where only 3% were not aware of the UK’s independent authority set up to uphold information rights in the public interest.

A lack of awareness, however, does not prevent the majority of private sector firms from having more than 10 members of staff dedicated to information security-related duties, compared to an average of 2 in public sector organisations. Quantity is not directly proportional to quality, it seems.

In reality, the public sector has had more reasons to be more data protection-savvy due to handling large volumes of personal and sensitive data. The private sector should start following their example. Regulations have become stricter and ICO fines are tougher, with the authority now able to impose a fine of up to £500,000 for a serious breach. It is important, then, that all firms improve their awareness of information security and that they have an efficient system in place for protecting personal and sensitive information, and to deal with any breach in the most appropriate manner.

Private organisations which deal with sensitive and confidential data – such as banks and law firms – should take these results as a wake-up call and an opportunity to learn from the public sector. They are in fact the most at risk of suffering major consequences in case of a breach of the DPA.

Critically, it is important to understand the steps for improving Information Security. First of all, it is vital that organisations are aware of their information assets and the associated risks. They can do this by conducting an assessment of their Information Security Management System, in particular the controls surrounding the information assets of the organisation. This can then be assessed against the international standard for Information Security ISO 27001, to identify any weak points, possible corrective actions and areas of risk.

Once these have been identified, it is possible to plan remedial work which covers policies, procedures and technology, as well as staff education and awareness, implementing it on a continuous cycle. It is important to note that documents and technology alone are not enough to guarantee an improvement; however, they can minimise information security risks.

Staff commitment, from senior management to the most junior employees, is the key to make all the controls and procedures work. If staff are not made aware of policies and procedures introduced, or are not willing to collaborate, perhaps because they do not understand why they should change the way they have always worked, then no amount of technology can keep an organisation in line with the appropriate standards and regulations.

At the same time, management need to take strong ownership and underline the importance of data protection with a clear Information Security statement; their strategy should include disciplinary actions for whoever does not adhere to the policies. Investing time and effort in prevention will pay off more than insurance, as the latter may reduce some of the damages although not the most important cost – the organisation’s reputation.

It is undeniable that although data security risks can be minimised, they cannot be completely eliminated – there will always be a human or technical error that results in sensitive data being lost, destroyed or disclosed. This, unfortunately, can happen in both the public and private sector, often even when all the appropriate measures are in place. For that, you can only act accordingly to the associated risks, for instance by allowing data to protect itself not only through encryption, but through the implementation of a data classification system that restricts access to unauthorised viewers.

Information Security is not a final destination; instead, it is a never-ending journey where everyone from senior management to service desk engineers commits to an ethos in order to protect personal information from loss, leakage and theft in a manner which is proportional to the identified risks.

 

David Cowan, Head of Consulting Services

This article is published on Infosecurity UK: http://www.infosecurity-magazine.com/view/16319/comment-public-vs-private-sector-information-security/

Are you Off-Sure about your IT Service Desk?

July 15, 2010

No matter the economic climate, or indeed within which industry they operate, organisations are constantly seeking to lower the cost of IT while also trying to improve performance. The problem is it can often seem impossible to achieve one without compromising on the other and in most cases, cost cutting will take prevalence, leading to a dip in service levels.

When things get tough the popularity of off-shoring inevitably increases, leading many decision-makers to consider sending the IT Service Desk off to India, China or Chile as a convenient solution financially – low-cost labour for high-level skills is how offshore service providers are advertising the service.

In reality things are not so straightforward. The primary reason for off-shoring is to reduce costs, but according to experts average cost savings only tend to lie between 10-15%, and what is more, additional costs can be created – research shows, in fact, that they can in some cases increase by 25%.

Hidden costs, cultural differences and low customer and user satisfaction are reasons which have made nearly 40% of UK companies surveyed by the NCC Evaluation Centre change their mind and either reverse the move – a phenomenon known as ‘back-shoring’ or ‘reverse off-shoring’ – or think about doing so in the near future. Once an organisation decides to reverse the decision, however, the process is not trouble-free. Of those who have taken services back in-house, 30% say they have found it ‘difficult’ and nearly half, 49%, ‘moderately difficult’. Disruptions and inefficiencies often lead to business loss, loss of client base and, more importantly, a loss of reputation – it is in fact always the client and not the provider which suffers the most damage in this sense.

Data security is another great concern in off-shoring. An ITV news programme recently uncovered a market for data stolen at offshore service providers: bank details and medical information could be easily bought for only a few pounds, often just from call centre workers. Of course information security breaches can happen even in-house, caused by internal staff; however, in off-shoring the risk is increased by the distance and the different culture and law which exist abroad.

Not a decision to be taken lightly, then. Organisations should realise that the IT Service Desk is a vital business tool and while outsourcing has its advantages, if they do it by off-shoring they are placing the face of their IT system on the other side of the planet, and in the hands of a provider that might not have the same business culture, ethics and regulations as they do.

So before thinking about off-shoring part or the whole IT department, organisations would be wise to take the time to think about why their IT is so expensive and what they could do to improve it, cutting down on costs without affecting quality, efficiency and security and moreover, not even having to move it from its existing location.

Here are some measures organisations could take in order to improve efficiency in the IT Service Desk while at the same time reducing costs:

Best practice implementation

Adoption of Best Practice is designed to make operations faster and more efficient, reducing downtime and preserving business continuity. The most common Best Practice in the UK is ITIL (Information Technology Infrastructure Library) which is divided into different disciplines – Change Management, Risk Management, Incident Management to name but a few.

ITIL processes can be seen as a guide to help organisations plan the most efficient routes when dealing with different types of issues, from everyday standard operations and common incidents up to rarer events and even emergencies.

Whilst incident management seems to be easily recognised as a useful tool, other applications of ITIL are unfairly seen by many as a nice to have. But implementing best practice processes to deal with change management, for example, is particularly important: if changes are carried out in a random way they can cause disruptions and inefficiencies, and when a user cannot access resources or has limited use of important tools to carry out their work, business loss can occur – and not without cost.

Every minute of downtime is a minute of unpaid work, but costs can also extend to customer relationship and perhaps loss of client base if the inefficiencies are frequent or very severe.

Realignment of roles within the Service Desk

With Best Practice in place, attention turns to the set-up of resources on the Service Desk. A survey conducted by Plan-Net showed that the average IT Service Desk is composed of 35% first-line analysts, 48% second line and 17% third line. According to Gartner statistics, the average first-line fix costs between £7 and £25 whereas second line fixes normally vary from £24 to £170. Second and third line technicians have more specific skills, therefore their salaries are much higher than the ones of first line engineers; however, most incidents do not require such specific skills or even physical presence.

An efficient Service Desk will be able to resolve 70% of their calls remotely at first line level, reducing the need for face-to-face interventions by second line engineers. The perception of many within IT is that users prefer a face-to-face approach to a phone call or interaction with a machine, but in reality the culture is starting to change thanks to efficiency acquiring more importance within the business. With second-line fix costing up to 600% more, it is better to invest in a Service Desk that hits a 70% rate of first-time fix, users for the most part will be satisfied that their issues are fixed promptly and the business will go along way to seeing the holy grail of reduced costs and improved performance simultaneously.

From a recent survey carried out by Forrester for TeamQuest Corporation, it appears that 50% of organisations normally use two to five people to resolve a performance issue, and 35% of the participants are not able to resolve up to 75% of their application performance issues within 24 hours. Once you calculate the cost of number of staff involved multiplied by number of hours to fix the incident, it is not difficult to see where the costly problem lies. An efficient solution will allow IT to do more with less people, and faster.

Upskilling and Service Management toolset selection

Statistics show that the wider adoption of Best Practice processes and the arrival of new technologies are causing realignments of roles within the Service Desk. In many cases this also involves changes to the roles themselves, as the increased use of automated tools and virtualised solutions mean more complex fixes can be conducted remotely and at the first line. As this happens first line engineers will be required to have a broader knowledgebase and be able to deal with more issues without passing them on.

With all these advancements leading to a Service Desk that requires less resource (and therefore commands less cost) while driving up fix rates and therefore reducing downtime it seems less and less sensible for organisations to accept off-shore outsourcing contracts with Service Level Agreements (SLA’s) that guarantee a first-time fix rate of as little as 20% or 30% for a diminished price. It seems the popularity of such models lies only in organisations not being aware that quality and efficiency are something they can indeed afford – without the risk of off-shoring.

The adoption of a better toolset and the upskilling of first-line analysts, especially through ITIL-related training, will help cut down on costs and undoubtedly improve service levels. However while it will also remove the necessity to have a large amount of personnel, especially at higher level, the issues with finding, recruiting and training resource will still involve all the traditional headaches IT Managers have always faced. With this in mind it can often be prudent to engage with a service provider and have a co-sourced or managed desk that remains in-house and under internal management control. Personnel selected by an expert provider will have all the up-to-date skills necessary for the roles required, and only the exact number needed will be provided, while none of the risks associated with wholesale outsourcing, or worse, off-shoring, are taken.

Improving IT infrastructure and enhancing security

Improving efficiencies in IT does not begin and end with the Service Desk of course. The platform on which your organisation sits, the IT infrastructure itself, is of equal importance in terms of both cost and performance – and crucially, is something that cannot be influenced by off-shoring. For example, investing in server virtualisation can make substantial cost savings in the medium to long term. Primarily this arises from energy saving but costs can also be cut in relation to space and building and maintenance of physical servers, not to mention the added green credentials. Increased business continuity is another advantage: virtualisation can minimise disruptions and inefficiencies, therefore reducing downtime – probably the quickest way to make this aspect of IT more efficient in the short, medium and long term.

Alongside the myriad of new technologies aimed squarely at improving efficiency and performance sits the issue of Information Security. With Data Protection laws getting tougher due to the new 2010 regulations, forcing private companies to declare any breaches to the Information Commissioner who has the right to make them public, and facing them with fines up to £500,000, security is becoming even more of an unavoidable cost than ever. Increased awareness is needed across the entire organisation as data security is not only the concern of the IT department, but applicable to all personnel at all levels. The first step in the right direction is having a thorough security review and gap analysis in order to assess compliance with ISO 27001 standards and study any weak points where a breach can occur. Then workshops are needed to train non-IT staff on how to deal with data protection. Management participation is particularly important in order to get the message across that data safety is vital to an organisation.

Taking a holistic view of IT

Whatever the area of IT under scrutiny, the use of external consultancies and service providers to provide assistance is often essential. That said, it is rare to find an occasion where moving IT away from the heart of the business results in improvements. The crucial element to consider then is balance. Many organisations, as predicted by Gartner at the beginning of this year, are investing in operational rather than capital expenditure as they begin to understand that adoption of the latest tools and assets is useless without a holistic view of IT. When taking this methodology and applying it to the Service Desk it soon becomes apparent that simply by applying a Best Practice approach to an internal desk and utilising the new technologies at your disposal, the quick-fix cost benefits of off-shoring soon become untenable.

Pete Canavan, Head of Support Services

This article is featured in the current issue of ServiceTalk

Is information safe enough at NHS trusts?

April 1, 2010

It looks like NHS trusts are starting to realise that Information Security is not just a matter of using complex passwords, locking drawers at the end of the day and installing the latest firewall and antivirus solutions. The Information Commissioner has been particularly critical of the NHS in the past due to a high proportion of security breaches as a result of inadequate Information Security controls and staff awareness programmes.

The result has been an NHS wide initiative to ensure all removable media including laptops and USB drives are encrypted. However, this may not be enough. As reported by the BBC recently, a remarkable amount of non-medical personnel at UK trusts have access to patient records including recent medical history – at least 100,000 including porters, hospital domestics and IT staff, a Big Brother Watch survey stated.

It seems like the risk is not only from staff at off-shore service providers collecting and selling British data to make a few extra pounds, as reported on ITV not long ago. It also comes from internal personnel who have the potential to access extremely sensitive data without the appropriate authority or preventative controls.

 This is not surprising: data collected in the BIS Information Security Breaches Survey 2009 illustrated that 60 per cent of all companies suffered a security breach in the previous two years and of these, 50 per cent were perpetrated by staff, often premeditated or malicious but in many cases simply a matter of a stolen laptop or lost removal media device.

There is an obvious need for greater awareness of information security regulations across the entire organisation, and measures must be taken to protect personal and sensitive data. Management in particular need to be involved in order to avoid resentment, complacency and to ensure everyone takes the matter seriously.

In the case of the NHS, information at risk is highly sensitive and breaches can have very serious outcomes. Consequences of Data Protection Act breaches are not confined to costly fines and a few employees being fired – it is the organisation’s reputation that suffers the most.

This risk can be mitigated by conducting an independent gap analysis and security review which would assess compliance with Information Security best practice, i.e. ISO27001, IG Toolkit v7, and certify that information held within an organisation is secure, reducing the risk of incidents and the cost to the business.

Equally important are staff awareness sessions to which not only general staff but executive participation is required, which is vital in creating a culture where Information Security is part of the organisation’s DNA.

 

David Cowan, Head of Infrastructure and Security